Identity Festival: A tits and bros party

While plenty of Seattle folks were getting glittered by Ke$ha at the WaMu Theater last Saturday, I took my tight-ass rocker pants to the Gorge Amphitheatre for the nationwide touring Identity Festival, a full day of electronic music by some of the hottest acts around right now.

Besides the Crystal Method set I saw at last year’s Voodoo Experience in New Orleans, the last electronic music event I went to was the USC fourth anniversary party in 2000.

Initially, I wasn’t even much of an electronic music fan, but because some of my best high school friends started going to raves, I started going to raves. I liked to be with my friends and I liked to party. The music grew on me, however, and I did become a moderate fan of the genre and its many branches.

In my opinion, electronic music is better now. I listen to a lot more of it. Dubstep seemed kind of weird at first, and I didn’t really get it, until I started paying attention. Glitch-hop was an immediate favorite.

High School Art Class – Pretty Lights:

Since my raving days, electronic music and its scene has definitely changed, and it was interesting not knowing what to expect when I went into the Identity Festival last weekend. It was also interesting discovering what’s different now, and even more what’s stuck around all these years. Here’s a breakdown of some things I observed while I was there:

  • I was overdressed in jeans and a T-shirt. Yes, it was certainly a hot day, but if I know the Gorge (and I do), it cools down at night, so I like to be prepared. As far as I could see, I was the only female person wearing long pants. The rest were either wearing shorts, tutus or bikinis. Almost all of them wore bikini tops. Even as a person who is not sexually attracted to girls, I couldn’t help but stare at all the cleavage. It was seriously everywhere.
  • Through this, I came to realize I may be the only girl left on the planet who doesn’t have butt dimples.

Yeah, these things.

  •  If all female electronic music fans are over-sexualized babes who I can only assume are super high-maintenance judging by the amount of work they put into their appearance for a day-long festival (one girl was wearing five-inch stilettos, no joke), it only makes sense that the males are a bunch of shirtless bros. Overall, I was very much not in my element. Not to mention, I’m pretty sure I was the oldest person there, or at least somewhere among the five oldest.
  • Back in my raving days, we got dressed up for these events, too. Some things haven’t changed. There were kandy bracelets galore, not to mention kandy necklaces and kandy ties. Another popular accessory were furry leg-warmers. Being that it was a hot day at the Gorge, I couldn’t be sure if furry pants are still “in” for rave kids, but I’m guessing so. They were huge for us.
  • One essential style difference I discovered were the preferred colors. Back in 1999, ravers wore mostly orange and green. On Saturday, the dominant colors were pink and yellow. It’d be interesting to find out why.
  • It’s a lot easier to pay attention to the scene when you’re sober. I recall the raves I attended, but thanks to a little happy pill, most of my rave experiences took place inside my head. Well, and a little bit inside my lady parts. I don’t even drink alcohol when I’m at live music events, so I was much better able to pay attention to my surroundings this time.
  • Glowstick dancing has evolved quite a bit. Back in my day, we’d weave glowsticks between our fingers and do the whole bit where we wave them around and all that. Now people have gloves, with glowing dots on the fingertips. They have windsock type things with balls on the ends that they swing around. Indeed. They swing their balls around.
  • The fest was much more crowded than any rave I’ve ever been to. Perhaps it has something to do with the fact that our raves weren’t exactly part of the mainstream at the time. Maybe it’s also the fact that when we went to raves, we didn’t go for the performers, but for the party. We sat around with our friends, or danced in the middle of the tent. We didn’t all stand before the platform while the DJ played for us. Clearly, like the Sasquatch! Music Festival in May, many people simply came to this event to be seen. But, also like Sasquatch!, people seem to genuinely care about the music that’s happening on stage. Which is good, because it was good.
  • DJs put on great shows. Pretty Lights used a lot of digital animation on various block-shaped set pieces that began looking like a cityscape. Kaskade exploded confetti all over the crowd at least a few times during his set. Nero had wonderful energy and made sure to cue us all to his upcoming bass drops by throwing out his hand and jumping up and down. It turned out to be a lot better than I expected, less people were on drugs and hardly anybody invaded my personal space. And unlike all those kids at the Ke$ha show, I’m not still digging glitter out of my ears. Maybe next time …

5 Comments to “Identity Festival: A tits and bros party”

  1. Do most girls have butt dimples? I don’t have butt dimples! Is there something wrong with me? Wait… Don’t answer that.

  2. Apparently they do! because they all just had bikini tops on and EVERY GIRL THERE had butt dimples. Not even exaggerating. It bothered me a little.

  3. Also not sure why my Pretty Lights mp3 isn’t working because it worked earlier when I first posted this.

  4. I also do not have butt dimples. Maybe it’s a new thing?

  5. I don’t think I have butt dimples. Maybe it’s something you can buy. As for overdressing at the Gorge, I do that every time I’m there. Always jeans, usually a t-shirt and I bring at least a coat or a sweatshirt, sometimes two of each. I end up looking like everyone’s mom. I’ve considered taking off my shirt so just my bra is showing just to fit in (no, actually, I haven’t but it’s a funny thought.)

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